Closing the Gap

High-quality public infrastructure is critical to the health and sustainability of Indigenous communities. The First Nations Infrastructure Institute (FNII) is an Indigenous-led initiative that will support Indigenous communities and organizations to plan, procure, own and manage their infrastructure assets on their lands.

Just as your home is more than a house…

Community Infrastructure is more than a collection of buildings and the roads that connect them. These are places of learning, belonging, sustainment, and healing.

FNII is an Indigenous-led organization designed to help Indigenous communities and organizations plan, procure, own and manage the places that have meaning to you.

Walking alongside Indigenous communities and organizations, our experienced roster of engineers, project managers and financial experts provide support services, workshops, templates and advice. All services are provided free of charge.

To learn more about the First Nations Infrastructure Institute download our free resources or book a workshop

Our Communities Deserve Better Infrastructure

The current approach is unsustainable and First Nations and Indigenous organizations expect and deserve better results.

Planning projects that get funded

Our four-step approach covers planning, procuring, and building and managing.

FNII services are free of charge

Indigenous communities and organizations can access FNII services at no cost.

The problems with the current First Nation infrastructure system are well-known – infrastructure on reserves takes too long to develop, costs too much to build, and does not last long enough. This contributes to a series of poor health, social and economic outcomes. A new Indigenous-led institution, backed by legislation is envisioned to tackle these issues.

ORGANIZATION UPDATES

News and Insights from FNII

05.31.2021
NEWS
First Nations Infrastructure Institute (FNII) Development Board calls for individual and collective action
Tk’emlups te Secwepemc [Kamloops, BC] The First Nations Infrastructure Institute (FNII) Development Board adds our voice to the growing chorus of First Nations communities and Indigenous organizations calling for individual and collective action in the wake of the discovery of remains of 215 children on the former grounds of Kamloops Indian Residential School. As an...